Category: Photoshop

Photoshop Editing Hints: Adding Lighting Effects

An ordinary photo has extraordinary possibilities when you open it in Adobe Photoshop CS2. In this tutorial, I’ll tell you how you can make some dramatic changes in your next photo by adding one of the lighting effects that come standard with your copy of Photoshop.

To begin, select a photo that you would like to work with and then create a copy of that photo so you don’t risk destroying the original version.

Next, you’ll want to sharpen your photograph using the Unsharp Mask filter found under Filters in your menu options. Once your image is crisp and ready to go then it’s time to start looking at some options for lighting effects.

To locate the lighting effects, go to Filter, Render, Lighting Effects in your Photoshop menu. You will then see the lighting effects dialogue box which will give you some options for controlling the kind of lighting you want to add to your photograph.

When you first open your lighting effects dialogue, Photoshop will set the lighting as being “Default”. Other options are available by using the pull down to look through the list of pre-installed lighting settings. Options such as Triple Spotlight, Flood Light and Flashlight are among the many options that are available. Click through each of these options to see the preview effect that it will have on your image. For the photo in my example, I selected the Flashlight option.

Once you’ve selected the type of lighting option you would like to use, you have the option of relocating the center point of the lighting effect, as well as the diameter of the effect by clicking and repositioning the points within the lighting effects preview box. Take a few minutes to play with these settings to get your lighting where you want it in order to make the greatest impact on your photo.

Some other adjustments that are in the lighting effects dialogue include an intensity slider which lets you control how weak or how strong the lighting effect is, and a focus slider which allows you to control how narrow or wide of a lighting effect is added. There are also sliders which can help you control the Gloss, Material, Exposure, and Ambience of the image. Adjust these sliders freely to see the many varieties of effects that can be created with just a simple click.

Once you’re satisfied with your lighting effects settings click on okay to apply those settings to your image. If you aren’t satisfied with your results, simply go to Edit, Step Backward, or use your History pallet to undo your effect and start over again.

In my example image, I went a few steps further after adding the lighting effect and desaturated the image by going to Image, Adjustments, Desaturate. I then applied one of the Underwater Photo Filter that is found under Image, Adjustments, Photo Filters.

By including lighting effects in your photo editing projects you can give your photos the punch they need to really stand out!…

Photoshop Buttons – Hot Pink Rounded Rectangle Button

In this Photoshop Tutorial I will show you how to create the Hot Pink Rounded Rectangle Button in my image. Please see the image that I have provided to see the ending results. I will write the first part of this tutorial for the Photoshop beginners. I will write the second part of this tutorial for the advance Photoshop users. If you are an advance user, please skip down to the advance part of this tutorial.

How to Create a Hot Pink Rounded Rectangle Button in Photoshop for Beginners

Step 1 – Creating a New Canvas
Create a new canvas 350 pixels by 350 pixels. Set your background color to the color that you need and click OK.

Step 2 – Creating a New Layer
Locate your Layers Panel on your screen. Press F7 on your keyboard if you do not see your Layers Panel. Click the icon in the bottom of the Layers Panel that looks like a sheet of paper with the corner curled up, to create a new layer.

Step 3 – Rounded Rectangle Tool
Select your Rounded Rectangle Tool from your toolbar. Set the radius to 10px. The radius is located at the top of your Photoshop window. Draw your button on your canvas. You can draw your button any size that you want.

Step 4 – Rasterizng the Layer
Right click on the Shape Layer in your Layers Panel and click Rasterize Layer from the pop up menu. Rasterizing the layer will make the edges of the button smooth.

Step 5 – Blending Options
Right click on that same layer again and click Blending Options from the pop up menu. Apply the following effects to your button in the Blending Options window. Make sure that you click on the word. If you just check the box for that effect, you will not see the options for that effect.

Bevel and Emboss

Style – inner bevel
Technique – smooth
Depth – 71
Direction – up
Size – 6
Soften – 0
Angle – 100
Use Global Light – unchecked
Attitude – 75
Gloss Contour – linear
Anti-aliased – unchecked
Highlight Mode – screen
Color – white
Opacity – 75
Shadow Mode – normal
Color – black
Opacity – 75

Color Overlay

Blend mode – normal
Color – fd02c5
Opacity 100

Stroke

Size – 1
Position – outside
Blend Mode – normal
Opacity – 100
Fill Type – color
Color – 9b0776

Click OK on the Blending Options window.

If you have any problems with this Photoshop Tutorial, please feel free to contact me using the contact button at the top of this page.

How to Create a Hot Pink Rounded Rectangle Button in Photoshop for the Advance

Step 1 – Create a new canvas 350px by 350px.

Step 2 – Create a new layer.

Step 3 – Select your Rounded Rectangle Tool and change the Radius to 10px.

Step 4 – Draw your button.

Step 5 – Rasterize your button layer.

Step 6 – Open your Blending Options for the button layer and apply the following effects.

Bevel and Emboss

Style – inner bevel
Technique – smooth
Depth – 71
Direction – up
Size – 6
Soften – 0
Angle – 100
Use Global Light – unchecked
Attitude – 75
Gloss Contour – linear
Anti-aliased – unchecked
Highlight Mode – screen
Color – white
Opacity – 75
Shadow Mode – normal
Color – black
Opacity – 75

Color Overlay

Blend mode – normal
Color – fd02c5
Opacity 100

Stroke

Size – 1
Position – outside
Blend Mode – normal
Opacity – 100
Fill Type – color…

Photoshop Tutorial: Selection Tools for Beginners

One of the most important processes for any Photoshop user from beginner to professional to understand is making selections. Selecting a specific part of a photo is essential to photo editing. Like any other process in Photoshop, there is more than one way to go about it.

If you look in the top left of the toolbar, you will find the marquee select tool just adjacent to the move tool. This tool defaults to rectangular marquee. This is the simplest and most intuitive of all selection tools, but is not without its limitations. With this tool selected, you simply click and drag to make square/rectangular selections of any proportion.

By clicking and holding the left mouse button on the marquee tool, a side panel drop-down menu will give you a choice of three other versions of the tool. These are: the elliptical tool, which allows you to make circular and oval selections, the vertical marquee tool, and the horizontal marquee tool. The latter two of these are not particularly useful.

On the toolbar, just below the marquee tool, you will find the lasso tool. This tool is only slightly more complex than the marquee tool, but much more powerful. By clicking and dragging, you can use the lasso tool to make a selection in any shape whatsoever. Releasing the left mouse button will make the selection active.

Just as with the marquee tool, you can bring up a drop-down menu by holding down the left mouse button on the lasso tool, bringing up two other types of lassos. The polygonal lasso works slightly different than the standard lasso but can be used to select complex shapes. By clicking, you set the start point. Each time you wish to draw at another angle, you click again. The selection is complete when you click at the start point, closing the selection. The next lasso tool is the magnetic lasso. This is the most useful tool for extracting specific elements of a photograph. The magnetic lasso automatically follows the contours of an object by the differences in light and dark. The sensitivity of the magnetic lasso is determined by the percentage of the edge contrast, located in the action bar at the top. Just like the polygonal lasso, you have to click back on the start point to close the selection.

The last of the selection tools is the magic wand which is located just to the right of the lasso tool. The magic wand makes selections according to similarities in color and saturation. If you click on a photo with magic wand, you will notice that it automatically selects a patchy group of color. By holding down the shift key, you can add more to the selection by continuing to click. Lowering the tolerance level in the action bar restricts the variance in color and contrast that the magic wand selects.

That's pretty much it. One last trick though: right clicking after making a selection will give you some extra options like: inversing the selection or feathering the selection (softening the edges).…

Creating Seamless Textures from Scratch in Photoshop

The steps in this guide will show you a few of the tricks in Photoshop designers need to know in order to create seamless textures. Before I start laying out the steps, it is important to consider what it is about a texture that makes it seamless.� A texture is just a detailed image that can be applied to an object (such as a web site's background, a video game character model, and countless other things).� A seamless texture means just that – it has no seams.� What are the seams of regular textures?� Most textures with seams are obvious; the edges of the texture are seams.� If the right side of the texture doesn't match with the left side, there is a seam.� However, even some supposed "seamless" textures have seams, which tells us that seams don't always exist just on the borders of the texture.

Think about it.� If the only requirement for a seamless texture is that the right side has to match the left side, then we could just mirror the image and we would have a seamless texture!� But sadly, the seam would still be as clear as day.� While going through this guide, keep in mind that while a texture can technically be "seamless", the human eye is exceptional at discerning patterns and creating a satisfactory seamless texture can be a lot of work.

One – The Photoshop Secret to Seamless Textures
Follow these steps:

  •  
  • Click File > New (CTRL + N).
  •  
  • Set Width and Height to 512 pixels.
  •  
  • Set Resolution to 72.
  •  
  • Set Color Mode: RGB Color (Anything but Greyscale).
  •  
  • Click OK.
  •  

Now that you have your canvas open, you're entitled to the secret of creating seamless textures in Photoshop.
There is a filter in Photoshop called Clouds (Filter > Render > Clouds) that does something useful when used on a canvas whose size is a power of two (…128, 256, 512, etc…).� It creates a seamless "Cloud" texture.

Two – Create the Base
Follow these steps:

  •  
  • Using the Swatches Pallete (Window > Swatches), find the "20% Grey" swatch, and click on it (Hover over or double click the swatch to see its name).
  •  
  • Press 'x' on the keyboard to swap foreground and background colors.
  •  
  • Using the Swatches Pallete, click the "45% Grey" swatch.
  •  
  • Use the Clouds Filter (Filter > Render > Clouds)
  •  

Let's take a look at what we have so far: not much, right?� Right.� If anything, it looks like an up-close picture of some rain clouds.� Unfortunately, we're not making rain cloud textures, we're making the base for our metal texture.� So, we need the image evened out a little bit.� For our purposes, we can use the High Pass Filter (Filter > Other > High Pass) to achieve this effect.

Follow these steps:

  •  
  • Start the High Pass Filter (Filter > Other > High Pass).
  •  
  • Set the Radius to ~16.
  •  
  • Click OK.
  •  

At first, it might look like High Pass only made the image darker.� But I assure you, there was more done.� Don't believe me?� Copy both layers and set the contrast up higher (Image > Adjustments > Brightness / Contrast).� Before High Pass, the image had bright and dark colors grouped together unevenly.� After High Pass with Radius 16, they are much more evenly mixed.
The High Pass Filter evened the cloud texture out for us so we can use it as a base of our texture, instead of just a solid grey (we could use a solid grey, but that's… boring).� The …